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  • What look like piano hammers is a mechanism for checking the quality and pile length of the cotton fibres. They are combed out on a felt pad – here with the help of an old tooth brush. Simple and practical.

    What look like piano hammers is a mechanism for checking the quality and pile length of the cotton fibres. They are combed out on a felt pad – here with the help of an old tooth brush. Simple and practical.

  • There, where the cotton fibres run into the cotton gin at high speeds a sign warns of the danger of accidents.

    There, where the cotton fibres run into the cotton gin at high speeds a sign warns of the danger of accidents.

  • The cotton that is delivered to be deseeded is separated according to quality and the method of cultivation (conventional or organic).

    The cotton that is delivered to be deseeded is separated according to quality and the method of cultivation (conventional or organic).

  • This very robust and solid cotton gin was photographed in Uganda. It separates the “white gold” from the cotton seeds. Only a third of the weight of the harvest is made up of the usable fibres, the rest is seeds and capsules.

    This very robust and solid cotton gin was photographed in Uganda. It separates the “white gold” from the cotton seeds. Only a third of the weight of the harvest is made up of the usable fibres, the rest is seeds and capsules.

The cotton gin separates the “white gold” from the cotton seeds gently and productively.

After the harvest the cotton gin separates – according to quality and method of cultivation (conventional or organic) – the cotton fibres from the seeds. 220 kg of the soft fibres form a bale and the seeds are then pressed to extract cotton oil. The rest is used as animal fodder. Only a third of the harvest is made up of usable fibres, the rest is seeds and capsules.